U.S. Ag Equipment Exports Up 15 Percent

U.S. Ag Equipment Exports Up 15 Percent

Sales of American farm machinery abroad showing healthy gains.

U.S. exports of agricultural machinery continued to grow in 2011 and ended the first half of the year with a gain of 15%, according to the Association of Equipment Manufacturers.

Midyear 2011 exports totaled $5.6 billion, reports the AEM.

The off-road equipment manufacturing trade group consolidates U.S. Commerce Department data with other sources into member global trend reports.

"Exports continue to provide a substantial boost to manufacturers' overall business as producers around the world seek enhance productivity to meet global food needs," says Charlie O'Brien, AEM vice president and agriculture sector leader.

"Export-friendly policies such as free trade agreements help American manufacturers and farmers stay in business, which translates into more jobs for U.S. workers," he adds. "That's a major tenet of our I Make America campaign and its spotlight on the importance of manufacturing to U.S. prosperity."

Among big sales for 2011, South America took delivery of $579 million worth of U.S.-made agricultural equipment, an increase of 56%, and Central America increased its purchases by 9% to total $506 million.

Asia's export purchases gained 13% to $483 million during the first six months of 2011. Exports to Australia/Oceania grew 20%, representing $452 million worth of farm-related equipment,.

Exports to Europe gained 19% to $1.6 billion, and exports to Canada increased 4% for a $1.8 billion total.

U.S. exports to Africa grew 13% for a total of $131 million.

The top-10 export destinations for U.S. farm equipment in order of dollar volume were:

Canada: $1.8 billion

Australia: $423 million

Mexico: $395 million

Germany: $260 million

Brazil: $242 million

France: $185 million

China: $179 million

Ukraine: $159 million

United Kingdom: $145 million

Russia: $124 million

Only China and the United Kingdom recorded declines in levels over year-earlier figures, reports the AEM.

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